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Dumplings

Short fiction by Michael Salmon

 

Another meal together. They couldn’t simply spend the evenings ignoring each other. Gary still wanted to complain a little.

“Why don’t we find a new place, outside the complex? I’m starting to feel like I’m living in a fortress. Let’s go somewhere out on the streets, you know?”

“Fine,” his cousin replied. “I know a good place.”

They walked to the back of Charlie’s apartment block, around the high metal fence you couldn’t see through. The buildings dropped in height and grew darker, and the streetlights changed colour, orange instead of white.

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Michael Salmon, Wed 26 November 2014 - 21:10

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Chengyu Tuesdays: Duck Romance

 

We're finishing up our run of chengyu with a few idioms for lovers, and then back to something completely different next month. This one is for all the mandarin ducks.

 

• 一见钟情 yījiànzhōngqíng – Love at first sight. Also connected is 一见如故 yījiànrúgù for that feeling when you meet someone like you’re old friends

• 擦肩而过 cājiānérguò – To brush shoulders but pass each other by. For missed connections, or when you’ve known someone a long time before falling for them

• 爱屋及乌 àiwūjíwū – Love me, love my dog. Although technically replace “me” with “my house”, and “dog” with “the crow [living in the rafters]”

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Anthill, Tue 25 November 2014 - 07:53

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Street Stories: The Ladies Within

A PHOTOGRAPHY SERIES FROM OUR FRIENDS AT SHANGHAI STREET STORIES

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Sue Anne Tay, Sat 22 November 2014 - 08:03

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My Father

Sitting the first gaokao after the Cultural Revolution – by Karoline Kan

 

For years, I hated my father. In my eyes, he was the most irresponsible dad in the world. He wasn’t earning money to support us. He didn’t enjoy family gatherings, and was always the first to leave the table. He didn’t care whether his kids were happy in school or not, but would be angry if we didn’t perform as well as he expected. He often quarreled with my mother, for reasons I didn’t understand.

“Who can you blame? It’s your own fate!” My mother would shout at him. Father would just stay silent, turn to the other side of the room and light a cigarette, while my mother again repeated the story from more than thirty years ago which in her mind led to father’s bitterness.

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Karoline Kan, Thu 20 November 2014 - 06:01

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Chengyu Tuesdays: Smashing Jade

完璧归赵 wánbìguī Zhào – return to its owner

 

完璧归赵 (wánbìguī Zhào) is literally "return the jade disc to Zhao", and means to return something to its rightful owner. As always, there's a (somewhat overwrought) story behind it:

 

A precious jade disc (the 和氏璧 héshìbì) was stolen from the state of Chu and sold to the state of Zhao. In 283 BC, King Zhaoxiang of Qin offered 15 cities to the state of Zhao in exchange for the jade disc. Zhao minister Lin Xiangru was dispatched to take the jade to Qin. He handed over the disc, but when it became clear that the King of Qin would not uphold his side of the bargain, he claimed that the jade had an imperfection.

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Anthill, Tue 18 November 2014 - 06:01

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New Kung Fu

Photos by Christopher Cherry, with an introduction by Sascha Matuszak

 

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Sascha Matuszak, Sat 15 November 2014 - 04:37